Elbert Parr Tuttle : chief jurist of the Civil Rights revolution (eBook, 2011) [University of Washington Libraries]
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Elbert Parr Tuttle : chief jurist of the Civil Rights revolution

Author: Anne Emanuel
Publisher: Athens, Ga. : University of Georgia Press, 2011.
Series: Studies in the legal history of the South.
Edition/Format:   eBook : Document : Biography : EnglishView all editions and formats
Summary:
"This is the first--and the only authorized--biography of Elbert Parr Tuttle (1897-1996), the judge who led the federal court with jurisdiction over most of the Deep South through the most tumultuous years of the civil rights revolution. By the time Tuttle became chief judge of the United States Court of Appeals for the Fifth Circuit, he had already led an exceptional life. He had cofounded a prestigious law firm,  Read more...
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Details

Genre/Form: Electronic book
Electronic books
Biographies
Biography
Additional Physical Format: Print version:
Emanuel, Anne (Anne S.), 1945-
Elbert Parr Tuttle.
Athens, Ga. : University of Georgia Press, 2011
(DLC) 2011012911
Named Person: Elbert P Tuttle; Elbert P Tuttle; Elbert P Tuttle
Material Type: Biography, Document, Internet resource
Document Type: Internet Resource, Computer File
All Authors / Contributors: Anne Emanuel
ISBN: 9780820341798 0820341797 1283252945 9781283252942
OCLC Number: 759160195
Description: 1 online resource (xx, 399 pages)
Contents: The legal lynching of John Downer --
The great migration --
Life was a breeze --
College years --
Sara Sutherland --
Founding a law firm and raising a family --
Gearing up for war --
The war years --
Building a republican party in Georgia --
The 1952 Republican national convention --
The Washington years --
The great writ --
Forming the historic Fifth circuit : nine men --
Justice is never simple : Brown I and II --
From Plessy to Brown to buses --
The desegregation of the University of Georgia --
The costs of conscience --
Oxford, Mississippi : the battleground --
The fight for the right to vote --
But for Birmingham --
The Houston conference --
Moving on --
The city almost too busy to hate --
Family and friends --
A jurisprudence of justice --
Hail to the chief --
and farewell --
Appendix 1. Law clerks to Judge Tuttle --
Appendix 2. Military honors --
Appendix 3. Awards and honors.
Series Title: Studies in the legal history of the South.
Responsibility: Anne Emanuel.

Abstract:

"This is the first--and the only authorized--biography of Elbert Parr Tuttle (1897-1996), the judge who led the federal court with jurisdiction over most of the Deep South through the most tumultuous years of the civil rights revolution. By the time Tuttle became chief judge of the United States Court of Appeals for the Fifth Circuit, he had already led an exceptional life. He had cofounded a prestigious law firm, earned a Purple Heart in the battle for Okinawa in World War II, and led Republican Party efforts in the early 1950s to establish a viable presence in the South. But it was the intersection of Tuttle's judicial career with the civil rights movement that thrust him onto history's stage. When Tuttle assumed the mantle of chief judge in 1960, six years had passed since Brown v. Board of Education had been decided but little had changed for black southerners. In landmark cases relating to voter registration, school desegregation, access to public transportation, and other basic civil liberties, Tuttle's determination to render justice and his swift, decisive rulings neutralized the delaying tactics of diehard segregationists--including voter registrars, school board members, and governors--who were determined to preserve Jim Crow laws throughout the South. Author Anne Emanuel maintains that without the support of the federal courts of the Fifth Circuit, the promise of Brown might have gone unrealized. Moreover, without the leadership of Elbert Tuttle and the moral authority he commanded, the courts of the Fifth Circuit might not have met the challenge"--Provided by publisher.
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