Heavy words lightly thrown : the reason behind the rhyme (Book, 2006) [University of Washington Libraries]
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Heavy words lightly thrown : the reason behind the rhyme

Heavy words lightly thrown : the reason behind the rhyme

Author: Chris Roberts
Publisher: New York : Gotham Books, 2006, ©2005.
Edition/Format:   Print book : English : 1st trade paperbackView all editions and formats
Summary:
Nursery rhymes are rarely as innocent as they seem--there is a wealth of concealed meaning in our familiar childhood verse. More than a century after Queen Victoria decided that children were better off without the full story, London librarian Roberts brings the truth to light. He traces the origins of the subtle phrases and antiquated references, revealing religious hatred, political subversion, and sexual  Read more...
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Details

Genre/Form: Criticism, interpretation, etc
Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: Chris Roberts
ISBN: 1592401309 9781592401307 1592402178 9781592402175
OCLC Number: 73810411
Notes: Originally published: Great Britain: Granta Books, 2004.
Description: xx, 202 pages : illustrations ; 20 cm
Contents: Little Jack Horner a squatter?: Little Jack Horner --
Taking divinity classes?: Jack be nimble --
It's falling down: London Bridge --
Who let them out?: Hark, hark, the dogs do bark --
Fancy a rub-a-dub, then, matey?: Rub-a-dub-dub --
Saucy geese?: Goosie, goosie, gander --
Piecing together the story: Humpty-Dumpty --
Who ate all the pie?: Sing a song of sixpence --
Bloody Mary, anyone?: Mary, Mary, quite contrary --
A short tale?: Three blind mice --
A child's guide to taxation: Baa, baa, black sheep --
So good they associated it twice: Grand old Duke of York --
Relationship rhymes: A frog would a-wooing go --
Disaster warning?: Ladybird, ladybird --
A swift tour of London?: Oranges and lemons --
Handbags at ten paces?: Tweedledum and Tweedledee --
I coulda been a pretender: William and Mary, George and Anne --
Doesn't sweat much, for a fat lad: Georgey Porgy --
A few stops beyond barking?: As I was walking o'er little moorfields --
By 'eck pet!: Elsie Marley is grown so fine --
American graffiti: Yankee Doodle --
Dial 999: London's burning --
A quiet word about lullabies: Baby love, my baby love --
Paved with gold?: Turn again, Whittington --
Cat in well's chance?: Ding dong bell --
Push, push, in the bush: Here we go round the mulberry bush --
A proper paddy?: This old man --
Penny for them?: Remember, remember --
Pigs in wigs: Animals in nursery rhymes --
Where have all the sparrows gone?: Who killed cock robin? --
Using or losing your head?: Little Boy Blue --
Want some Jack and Jills?: Jack and Jill --
Land of my fathers: Taffy was a Welshman --
One everyone knows ... : Ring-a-ring o'roses --
It's the getting there that counts: Ride a cock horse to Banbury Cross --
Kitty Fisher, now she's a sort: Lucy Locket --
Would you Adam & Eve it?: Pop goes the weasel --
The odd couple: Jack Spratt --
Wages of sin?: See saw, Marjorie Daw --
Pipe and slippers: Old King Cole was a merry old soul.
Responsibility: Chris Roberts.

Abstract:

Nursery rhymes are rarely as innocent as they seem--there is a wealth of concealed meaning in our familiar childhood verse. More than a century after Queen Victoria decided that children were better off without the full story, London librarian Roberts brings the truth to light. He traces the origins of the subtle phrases and antiquated references, revealing religious hatred, political subversion, and sexual innuendo. A history lesson that makes astonishing connections to contemporary popular culture, this book is for Anglophiles, parents, history buffs, and anyone who has ever wondered about the origins of rhymes. The book features a glossary of slang and historical terms, and silhouettes of Mother Goose characters to accompany the rhymes.
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